Friday, Sept 5, 2003  content presented by Telluride Today .com About The Watch

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Airport Noise Study in Jeopardy After Equipment Is 'Turned Over'

 

A 'Bovine Crime?'… Noise Abatement Procedures Seem to Work…

 

By Elizabeth Covington

 

Was it kids playing? The wind? The SMVC ‘s cows?

When the noise monitoring equipment placed by airport noise consultants Coffman and Associates registered an overload last Wednesday morning, the on-site consultant and Telluride Regional Airport Authority manager Rich Nuttall knew something was wrong.

Nuttall and the consultant had the equipment reset by Wednesday evening, but when they found it knocked over again on Thursday they decided to move the costly equipment to a more secure location.

"Both microphones were lying on the ground despite stakes securing them, and both the bird cages and protective wind screens were no longer attached to the equipment," said the Coffman consultant attending the study in a memo written by Nuttall to airport authority board chair John Micetic on Friday. "One of the bird cages was damaged."

On Friday Nuttall also filed a report with the San Miguel County Sheriff's office, complaining of suspicious activity and stating that the equipment had been "overturned on two occasions.

“He only wanted to document the situation in case of further incidents," continued the sheriff's report. 

Though the suspicious equipment tampering may have been the work of vandals, the residents of Last Dollar certainly did not have an interest in disrupting a study they requested, pointed out Michael Bugg, Last Dollar resident and outspoken opponent of the proposed airport expansion. The airport board has proposed an expansion project that includes lengthening the runway, leveling the dip and expanding the safety areas at a cost of $50 million, and future additions to the airport building and hangars proposed in an expanded airport master plan.

"This is bad that we have lost all that data," said Bugg on Tuesday. According to the Coffman consultant, each time the equipment was reset, gathered data was lost. When contacted at the airport on Tuesday, Nuttall declined to comment saying only that he had nothing to say until the monitoring was finished. The monitoring equipment was set up again on Sunday between two condominium buildings at Last Dollar and on Tuesday Nuttall would not confirm whether the balance of the study, intended to run through that day, was successful.

Last Dollar resident Bill deAlva, however, who visited the first monitoring site on two occasions was convinced that cattle grazing on San Miguel Valley Corporation property adjoining Last Dollar (and where the microphones were set up) turned over the microphones.

On Thursday afternoon when he learned through an email that the equipment had been knocked over for a second time, he "marched up behind the house and looked. There was a solid path twenty-feet wide of fresh cow prints," he said.

The microphones were set up in the cow pasture, according to deAlva, and the recording equipment was chained to the fence on the north side of his house. The fence separates the Last Dollar subdivision from the cow pasture, which is owned by San Miguel Valley Corporation.

"I agreed to have the monitoring equipment on my property," deAlva said. "When they came to set up they couldn't find a place far enough from my building. They were concerned about reflected sounds." So the consultant set up the microphones in the pasture.

"When I came home Friday mid afternoon, I sat down and up pops an email from Nuttall announcing he had pulled the equipment because it had been vandalized a second time," said deAlva

 

NOISE ABATEMENT WORKED

In spite of the difficulties with conducting the study, many Last Dollar residents reported that air traffic during the Labor Day weekend was noticeably quieter.

"The other ironic thing about this scenario is that last week, for the first time since the airport opened, the airport managed to get the pilots to comply with the noise abatement procedures," said deAlva. "There were virtually no aircraft flying over pretty much through [Monday].

The weekend was so quiet it was weird, confirmed Michael Bugg.

Daria Bugg, Michael's wife and also a ten-year resident of Last Dollar, agreed that the weekend was unusually quiet.

"From Saturday at two in the afternoon until eight in the evening [when they left the house], there were no planes over Last Dollar," said Daria. "And again all Sunday morning until noon."

"The irony is that it finally started working after 16 years of the airport being open, the week that they decided to do a sound study. There were literally no planes flying over and it was quieter here than in the deadest of off-season," said deAlva, who has lived in Last Dollar for nearly 16 years. "That is good news. It is evidence that they can make the pilots comply with the noise procedures."

Micetic agreed that the news of no noise was good news.

"That is the best news I've heard in a year. Conrad [Rauh, another Last Dollar resident] said he had never heard it so quiet," Micetic said. "I think if we can put good heads together we can do positive things."

While noise abatement procedures are voluntary (because of liability issues, the Federal Aviation Administration does not allow airports to enforce the procedures), airports are permitted to develop such procedures and educate pilots about those procedures. Recent efforts by the airport authority board to get the word out to pilots appears to be working.

"Maybe the word has gotten out," said airport board member Brian Eaton, a local resident and commercial pilot for Delta Airlines who has worked on proactive efforts to help the board educate pilots. "We are trying to be good neighbors."

According to Eaton, Nuttall is placing a video and a map on the airport's website this month; both illustrate what route pilots should follow when approaching the Telluride airport.

"With the map the pilots can see where the homes are in Last Dollar and Aldasoro, and see the Peaks," said Eaton. While folks have known they can call the airport and file a noise complaint, Eaton said more recently the airport has been proactive in following up on the complaints and contacting the offending pilot.

"We find the pilot and ask him to watch the video and I will follow-up on that if necessary," said Eaton

A map of the area showing the "Telluride No Fly Zones," according to Eaton, will also be placed in the operations area of the airport.

"I vote they hire somebody to be on the post everyday," said Daria, adding that the airport's technique of following up with the pilots seemed to have been particularly effective.

 

 

EDITED AND SAVED TO PRODUCTION BY EMC

 

Brother Al Johnston

 

June 24, 1926 – Aug. 31, 2003

 

“Brother Al” Johnston, local preacher, KOTO disc jockey and Free Box aficionado, died Sunday morning at the KOTO studios of a heart attack. He was 77.

KOTO Station Manager Ben Kerr found Brother Al at the studio on Sunday morning where he died just prior to his weekly program “Unshackled.” Many people have said that it was fitting that Brother Al died doing something he loved to do – hosting his classical music and religious drama show, a production he had been DJing since KOTO’s inception in 1975. That run made him KOTO's longest running DJ.

While most members of the community knew Brother Al as an eccentric religious man with a Sunday morning radio show, few knew that when he arrived in town he led a Southern Baptist congregation in the church that is now home to the Telluride Christian Fellowship. According to TCF Pastor Chuck Barry, Brother Al, who was an ordained Southern Baptist Minster, led that congregation in the late 60s. When that the congregation lost its building and Brother Al's ministry ended with the congregation, he joined KOTO as DJ and his Sunday morning show became his big love; he rarely missed a show. He was known to frequent the Free Box, but often he wasn’t always looking for himself. More often, Brother Al was looking for things to donate to missions in Mexico and other places.

Parry came to know Brother Al over the past five years during summer worship services in Town Park, after which Brother Al always enthusiastically participated in the picnics.

“Brother Al really loved a meal,” Parry said chuckling.

Certain members of the KOTO family and the Telluride community knew Brother Al’s health was failing, and Parry said that though his body had become feeble and it was harder for him to walk, a Sunday morning listener wouldn’t be able to discern that.

“To hear his voice on the radio – he was so clear and strong. He had a voice that projected. You wouldn’t know from his radio voice that was the same feeble person,” Parry said.

Telluride resident Don Smith came to knew Brother Al during the time he ministered to the Southern Baptist congregation. When the congregation lost their building, Brother Al opted to stay in town and minister where he was.

"He had this program at KOTO for what seems like forever, and that became his ministry," said Smith. "Or at least it was part of his ministry. He also took on some custodial work and when he met would meet people on the street and on his custodial jobs, he was a pastor wherever he was."

Smith always found Brother Al to be a sincere person.

"We would have a meal with him, and he was always interested in what we were doing with family and children," said Smith.

This week many Telluride residents shared favorite memories of Brother Al. They talked about the time he dressed up as Santa Claus or that he always remembered children’s names. Pamela Lifton-Zoline remembered Brother Al as incredibly kind and always having fortitude, bravery and courage in the face of life’s travails.

“It was clear to me when I first met him that he was somebody who lived in a heightened way," she said this week. "He had a particular gentleness and operated from a place of what seemed to be a kind of joyousness that was genuine, but not dogmatic.

“When someone suddenly dies, you realize they had a big part in the community. We’ve had three shocks in quick succession, and you don’t have to know them well to feel the hole left.”

Luigi Chiarani, a fellow KOTO DJ and who knew Brother Al from KOTO, said that though he sometimes finds exuberant religious people annoying, he would never say that about Brother Al.

“To people who were new in town over the last five years, they were somewhat afraid to approach him because of his outward appearance,” Chiarani said. “If you could just have the curiosity, especially in a small community to have enough respect for your community members to get to know them, then you would find that he was a great person.”

Among those remembering Brother Al, there was a shared common sentiment – that he was genuine, caring, radiant, warm and loving, that he had a deep relationship with Jesus Christ, and that he will be truly missed by the community.

Brother Al is survived by his wife, Joyce, and his daughter Debby.

A memorial service will be held on Sunday at 3:30 p.m. under the canopy in Town Park. Community members are asked to bring a remembrance, anecdote or fond thought of Brother Al to share at the service.

 

Drug

 

Appeals Court Upholds Officers’ Right to Stage Fictitious Drug Checkpoints

 

Kicker - Defendant in June 2000 Sting Convicted of Petty Offense and Fined $100 Will Appeal

 

 

By Liz Lance

 

The use of fake drug checkpoints to root out drug offenders has been upheld by the Colorado Court of Appeals.

The 22nd Judicial District Drug Task Force (made up of La Plata, Montezuma and Dolores County law enforcement agencies) used this tactic during the Bluegrass Festival in 2000. Setting up signs that read “Narcotics Checkpoint, One mile Ahead” and “Narcotics Canine Ahead,” camouflaged officers hid in the bushes along Hwy. 145 north of Rico looking for people throwing things out of their cars or turning around upon seeing the signs.

Stephen Roth was arrested after his passenger was seen throwing something out of the car. One officer saw the littering and radioed ahead to another officer to pull Roth’s vehicle over.  The first officer then recovered a pipe with what was believed to be marijuana residue and told the second officer, who asked to search the vehicle. Even though Roth refused the search, officers found a bag of hallucinogenic mushrooms and two more marijuana pipes. Roth was ultimately acquitted of the unlawful possession of mushrooms, but convicted of the petty offense of possession of a marijuana pipe and fined $100.

In appealing the conviction, Roth contended that the fictitious checkpoint violated Constitutional protections against unreasonable searches and seizures, but the court disagreed. In its opinion, citing a similar case involving “fictitious” drug checkpoints, United States v. Flynn, the court concluded “it was not unconstitutional for the police officers to have created a ruse which caused the defendant to abandon an item of property, the discovery of which provided reasonable suspicion to stop the defendant’s vehicle.”

But Telluride attorney Dick Unruh, who represented Roth in the case, said the Court missed the point. “This was, in all respects a drug checkpoint. It wasn’t a ruse,” Unruh argued. “They were stopping everyone,” including vehicles that neither turned back nor tossed contraband out the window.

Unruh said he would be filing an appeal with the Supreme Court of Colorado shortly.

Dolores County Sheriff Jerry Martin is “pretty confident” that the appeal would come back in support of the operation. He said the task force had originally brainstormed the idea and used it four times with great success, before suspending the practice while the appeal was being decided. Martin could not comment on whether the practice would again be suspended if an appeal is filed with the State Supreme Court.

“A person’s biggest enemy is their conscience,” Martin said. “That, in itself, is the intimidator.”

The purpose of the operation is to restrict drug-trafficking in the area, and not to infringe on people’s constitutional rights, Martin emphasized. The officers, he said, only stopped people who littered, sped or made illegal or dangerous U-turns.

“I have spent a good part of my life defending the constitutional rights of people and at no point would I ever lay that down for an operation. That is not the intention.

“I am trying to stop something that I think is detrimental,” Martin said.

San Miguel County Sheriff Bill Masters said that while he highly respects Martin for having a high sense of ethics and fairness, and that he considers him “the best sheriff in the state,” he disagreed with the tactics used in this case.

“We both feel very strongly that people shouldn’t be using drugs,” Masters said, referring to himself and Martin. “When you look at the overall impact on stopping the use of drugs in our county, I don’t think it’s had any impact,” he said of the staged drug checkpoint.

“Personally,” Masters added, “I’m not going to authorize the use of [fictitious drug checkpoints] in my department. Even though it’s maybe legal methods, I don’t particularly care for them.

“If we put all our thoughts and energies into finding why people use drugs and helping those who are addicted, we’d have a lot more success in keeping a sober society.”

Craig Ferguson, the director of the Telluride Bluegrass Festival (who is also an attorney), said that he had a hard time understanding the legality of the practice of fake drug checkpoints, calling it “a silly way to fight a drug war.” Ferguson said that Planet Bluegrass helped with legal fees for a class-action lawsuit, which was settled out of court.

“This hasn’t affected the festival a bit, other than the arrogance and annoyance of that conduct which we feel is inappropriate,” Ferguson said. Of arrests made by officers at the staged drug checkpoint, Ferguson added: “I don’t feel there was any validation that the festival attracts a bad crowd.”

Wilkinson Library Gets High-Tech Self Check-Out Machine

-- 3M 7210 Is Being Slowly, Slowly Introduced to Patrons

By Liz Lance

 

Don’t worry – it’s actually easier than trying to check out your own groceries at the supermarket. The Wilkinson Library has installed a 3M 7210 Self-Check Machine that allows patrons to check out their own books, increasing both the efficiency of the circulation desk staff and the privacy of the patron.

Oak Smith, head of circulation, said the library has been especially concerned about protecting the privacy of patrons, and while the librarians never discuss who checks out what, there is concern that some people may still feel inhibited about checking out certain materials simply because of the human behind the counter.

And so, Smith said, because it’s that main purpose of the library to provide access to information, if there is any reason that prevents someone from getting information they need, the library will look for a solution.

In this case, all roads led to the machine dubbed 3M 7210.

According to Library Director Robin Magee, the solution did not come cheap. Priced at $27,000, the machine may be simple for the user, Magee said, but it’s as complex as it is expensive, on the inside.

“There’s a lot of stuff that goes on behind the scenes when you circulate a book that’s invisible to the public eye,” she added.

Magee has been aware of the availability of self checkout technology for several years and was thinking about purchasing a machine like this even before it moved to the new building.

One of the particular selling points of this machine, Magee said, is that it was equipped both to handle self check-outs and radio tagging technology which the library is planning to implement in January.

Smith’s eyes light up when he starts talking about the radio technology it utilizes.

Starting next year, all items in circulation will be both bar-coded and radio-tagged. The machine will read the frequency of the tag on each book, making everything from checking items in and out to library inventory that much easier on the humans who still be behind the front desk.

With the new technology, a patron can bring a stack of books up to the machine and check them all out at once. The same goes for checking books in — librarians can increase their efficiency in the same way. Moreover, a librarian with a hand-held reader can walk through the aisles of the library and scan all of the books with a wave of a hand, which will help maintain a current inventory, help the librarians know which books aren’t being checked out, and perhaps even locate items believed to be missing.

The self-check machine is currently set up at the main circulation desk; as users become familiar with the technology, it will ultimately be moved to a more private location. While some patrons have complained about the decreased human interaction, Smith insists that the goal is not to de-humanize the library. If patrons want to talk with a librarian at the circulation desk, they will always be there to help.

“This machine is not to take away from our jobs, but to supplement us,” Smith said.

Appeal Filed Protesting Fees at Little Molas Lake

 

An appeal has been filed protesting the Forest Service’s decision to develop a new fee area at Little Molas Lake on the San Juan National Forest, which would charge for picnicking, day use, and camping. The lake is located about one mile from Highway 550 near the top of Molas Pass between Durango and Silverton.

Although the Land and Water Conservation Act of 1965 prohibits federal agencies from charging a fee “solely for the use of picnic tables,” day users at Little Molas Lake would be charged a fee for exactly that.

“Little Molas is one of the last remaining places on the San Juan National Forest that allows free recreation close to a highway and near a lake. It is relatively undeveloped and the people who use it like it that way,” said co-appellant Kitty Benzar of Durango. “There are plenty of options for those who want developed recreation and are willing to pay for it, but this is one of the last places where low-income and working people can still camp and picnic in a such a beautiful place on their public lands for free.”

The Forest Service plan calls for a 20-site campground, a fee-collection kiosk, a potable water system, and a day-use picnic area at the lake, as well as a parking lot beside Highway 550. Three new toilets are planned, including one at the highway parking lot. A private, for-profit company would manage both day use and camping. Camping would cost about $10-$12 and picnicking would cost $5-$6. Fees would be set by the concessionaire and could be raised without public input. The plan would cost $700,000 to implement.

A scaled-back plan to rehabilitate the area’s vegetation, designate 15 primitive camping spots, replace the existing toilet with a barrier-free, minimum-odor model, and improve the access road is favored by the group of 12 appellants. The more moderate plan, known as Alternative 3, would cost only $163,000 and would leave access to the area free for both campers and day users.

“The overwhelming majority of those who commented favored rehabilitation, not development,” said Ron DeWitz of Silverton, another co-appellant. “The Forest Service decision ignored the fact that public opinion was overwhelmingly against their plan, while overwhelmingly favoring Alternative 3. This decision was a done deal and the public comment period was nothing but a sham. We know that the Little Molas Lake area needs rehabilitation, but their plan is way over the top.”

Two co-founders of the Western Slope No-Fee Coalition, Benzar and Robert Funkhouser of Norwood, are among the 12 appellants, as are DeWitz and several other Silverton residents, including Silverton Mayor Jim Huffman, Town Councilor Dave Fiddler and San Juan County Commissioner Terry Rhoades.

Grounds for the group’s appeal include the Forest Service’s failure to adequately consider comments opposing the day use fee, the visual intrusion of the new parking lot on the viewshed of the San Juan Skyway National Scenic Byway, and unfair competition between the new campground and nearby Molas Lake Park, operated by the Town of Silverton.

Funding for the proposed project would include $346,000 from Durango Mountain Resort. DMR was required to provide that amount as part of a land swap that gave them ownership of the Purgatory Campground across from the resort, which is being converted to homesites. Another $100,000 would come from a federal highways grant for enhancement of scenic byways. The remaining $254,000 would be taxpayer funded.

“It mystifies me how yet another parking lot in the area, right on the road, would enhance the scenic view,” DeWitz asserted. “This parking lot is not needed and would be an eyesore in the middle of one of the most beautiful views anywhere in the world.”

“At a time when the Forest Service is claiming an $800 million dollar maintenance backlog and raiding recreation funds for firefighting, it makes no sense to build expensive new infrastructure,” said Benzar. “Their plan is far in excess of what is necessary to rehabilitate the area and will just add to the maintenance backlog. Its nuts.”

Interested parties can comment about the appeal until September 30 to Regional Forester Rick Cables, P.O. Box 25127, Lakewood, CO 80225, rcables@fs.fed.us. Copies of the appeal can be obtained by calling Kitty Benzar at 970/259-4616 or Ron DeWitz at 970/387-5113.

 

 

Happy Trails for Seabiscuit

Kicker - Equine Star in Hit Movie Semi-Retires to Skyline

 

In the movie of that title, he’s Seabiscuit, but in real life, this four-year-old thoroughbred named Fighting Ferrari has semi-retired to Skyline Guest Ranch.

“We’re friends with Frank Marshall and Kathleen Kennedy,” the husband-and-wife producers of Seabiscuit (now playing at the Nugget Theater), says Skyline’s Cindy Farny. Of Fighting Ferrari, she says: “He has been up here for about a month.

“They ended up using approximately ten horses in the movie,” she went on to explain, because “certain horses were better than others in certain shots.”

But think of those nine other horses as stunt doubles for Ferrari, who, in addition to being the main horse-actor, “was used in most of the close-up shots” as well.

“Everybody loves this horse. He is really a sweetheart,” says Farny. “He has a great disposition.”

In other words, Ferrari is not demanding star treatment?

“Oh, no,” says Farny, and hands the telephone over to Dave, her dad, who is working closely with the former race horse.

“He’s a beautiful horse,” says Farny senior of his equine pupil who is, arguably, the most lovable non-human movie character since E.T.

“I’m going to ride him today.

“He’s the horse Toby Maguire rides in the movie,” Farny adds. “He’s got a good rein – he’ll spin, turn, stop, slide – he’ll do anything. He’s a well-trained horse. A lot of the other race horses were sort of uncontrollable; all they did was race.

The two cowboys in Montana who “spent a lot of time training him” are thrilled that Ferrari has retired to Skyline Guest Ranch, and will now live out the relatively low-pressure life of life on the trail.

“They think it’s so wonderful he gets to be a horse, and not a racer,” says Farny, so that instead of a racetrack by day and nights in a stall, he’ll wander the back country by day and “be turned out on grass at night.”

Although getting Ferrari to enjoy what is, for a race horse, his twilight years, might take some time. “He’s afraid of things right now,” Farny says.

For example: “He’s never been out on the trail; he’s never crossed water. We’re teaching him those things.”

 

 

Sports

 

Multitasking to Extremes: Tiffany Moore Races, Studies and Works

 

Nontraditional MA Program Makes It Possible

 

By Liz Lance

 

Who says you can’t work fulltime, organize a bike-racing organization, race in your own events and work on your Master’s degree at the same time? Local dynamo Tiffany Moore is doing all of those things, and with gusto.

Twenty-three-year-old Moore became a full-time Telluride resident in June 2002 after getting her Bachelor’s degree in world literature with a concentration in religious education from the University of Maine. As part of her undergraduate degree, Moore studied abroad in England, specifically looking at a new religious movement in West Britain. As an undergraduate, and now a graduate student, Moore says she has always appreciated interdisciplinary thinking and teaching.

After finishing at Maine, Moore started working with juvenile offenders for Alternative Youth Adventures based in Utah. The experiential program immerses teenagers in the wilderness, where they must learn to survive as a member of a team in a drug-free environment and learn how to reintegrate back into the community with the skills they acquire on the program. Moore said while working for AYA, she realized she had a natural ability to be a counselor.

“AYA is a fantastic organization that works with adjudicated youth to help them understand themselves better and be a catalyst for positive change,” Moore explained.

Programs like this one, she said, are becoming more widely accepted as valid forms of psychotherapy, and when she decided she was looking for a graduate program, colleagues from AYA suggested she look at Prescott College in Arizona. Prescott offers graduate degrees to students on a distance, or low-residency basis, allowing them to continue working full-time while in school. Moore decided on a Master’s program in Counseling and Psychology with a concentration in adventure-based counseling.

“The interdisciplinary nature allows you to study things not available in a traditional college,” she said. “It’s a non-traditional MA program, which is great; it makes education more available by providing students with leading people in their field.”

Moore said she studies at least 30 hours a week while in Telluride and every two months travels to Prescott for about five days for seminars. She also communicates daily by email with her advisor Sandy Nuez, who is in North Carolina, and talks on the phone with her at least once a week. Was it mentioned that Moore also works full time at Bootdoctors, spends at least six hours a week managing Team Telluride, and is a downhill bicycle racer in her free time?

“I love Telluride, the community, the businesses, the people. I have a great job at Bootdoctors and I didn’t want to give it up,” Moore explained as her reason for choosing the Prescott program.

While all of this activity can leave Moore feeling overwhelmed from time to time (“I lose my shit constantly”), she falls back on the skills she learned from AYA – multi-tasking, time management and delegating responsibility. And she takes bubble baths, on average, four a week, according to boyfriend Jim Wynn. Moore said she follows a basic theory of success – “What I’m good at, I practice – and has learned to recognize her stress triggers and stop and focus on what’s important.

Gravity bicycle racing has also helped. The whole reason she first got on a bike 14 months ago, she said, was that she would see her friends go out and have fun while she was stuck waiting for them. Now she is the driving force behind Team Telluride and racing strong in regional downhill and mountain cross events.

“I want to be as fast as Ana on my bike,” Moore said with a twinkle in her eye, referring to teammate Ana James, who will soon be turning pro.

Wynn said Moore was a definite inspiration to the team as she always strives to succeed. “She took us by the reins and got us much more organized and really pulled something killer together.”

Wynn continued: “She’s always biting off a lot, but I wouldn’t say more than she can chew.... I constantly remind her she’s coming down on herself really hard; she gets afraid she takes on too much. Yeah, she does, but she manages to get through it.”

Moore will be working on her Master’s degree for the next two and a half years, a time period she is sure will be sleep-deprived and very challenging. Moore insists, though, that with her friends and support network, she’ll be able to get through it.

Wynn was also confident in his girlfriend’s abilities. “It’s right up her alley,” he said before adding, “I love her to death.”

Airport Noise Study in Jeopardy After Equipment Is 'Turned Over'

 

A 'Bovine Crime?'… Noise Abatement Procedures Seem to Work…

 

By Elizabeth Covington

 

Was it kids playing? The wind? The SMVC ‘s cows?

When the noise monitoring equipment placed by airport noise consultants Coffman and Associates registered an overload last Wednesday morning, the on-site consultant and Telluride Regional Airport Authority manager Rich Nuttall knew something was wrong.

Nuttall and the consultant had the equipment reset by Wednesday evening, but when they found it knocked over again on Thursday they decided to move the costly equipment to a more secure location.

"Both microphones were lying on the ground despite stakes securing them, and both the bird cages and protective wind screens were no longer attached to the equipment," said the Coffman consultant attending the study in a memo written by Nuttall to airport authority board chair John Micetic on Friday. "One of the bird cages was damaged."

On Friday Nuttall also filed a report with the San Miguel County Sheriff's office, complaining of suspicious activity and stating that the equipment had been "overturned on two occasions.

“He only wanted to document the situation in case of further incidents," continued the sheriff's report. 

Though the suspicious equipment tampering may have been the work of vandals, the residents of Last Dollar certainly did not have an interest in disrupting a study they requested, pointed out Michael Bugg, Last Dollar resident and outspoken opponent of the proposed airport expansion. The airport board has proposed an expansion project that includes lengthening the runway, leveling the dip and expanding the safety areas at a cost of $50 million, and future additions to the airport building and hangars proposed in an expanded airport master plan.

"This is bad that we have lost all that data," said Bugg on Tuesday. According to the Coffman consultant, each time the equipment was reset, gathered data was lost. When contacted at the airport on Tuesday, Nuttall declined to comment saying only that he had nothing to say until the monitoring was finished. The monitoring equipment was set up again on Sunday between two condominium buildings at Last Dollar and on Tuesday Nuttall would not confirm whether the balance of the study, intended to run through that day, was successful.

Last Dollar resident Bill deAlva, however, who visited the first monitoring site on two occasions was convinced that cattle grazing on San Miguel Valley Corporation property adjoining Last Dollar (and where the microphones were set up) turned over the microphones.

On Thursday afternoon when he learned through an email that the equipment had been knocked over for a second time, he "marched up behind the house and looked. There was a solid path twenty-feet wide of fresh cow prints," he said.

The microphones were set up in the cow pasture, according to deAlva, and the recording equipment was chained to the fence on the north side of his house. The fence separates the Last Dollar subdivision from the cow pasture, which is owned by San Miguel Valley Corporation.

"I agreed to have the monitoring equipment on my property," deAlva said. "When they came to set up they couldn't find a place far enough from my building. They were concerned about reflected sounds." So the consultant set up the microphones in the pasture.

"When I came home Friday mid afternoon, I sat down and up pops an email from Nuttall announcing he had pulled the equipment because it had been vandalized a second time," said deAlva

 

NOISE ABATEMENT WORKED

In spite of the difficulties with conducting the study, many Last Dollar residents reported that air traffic during the Labor Day weekend was noticeably quieter.

"The other ironic thing about this scenario is that last week, for the first time since the airport opened, the airport managed to get the pilots to comply with the noise abatement procedures," said deAlva. "There were virtually no aircraft flying over pretty much through [Monday].

The weekend was so quiet it was weird, confirmed Michael Bugg.

Daria Bugg, Michael's wife and also a ten-year resident of Last Dollar, agreed that the weekend was unusually quiet.

"From Saturday at two in the afternoon until eight in the evening [when they left the house], there were no planes over Last Dollar," said Daria. "And again all Sunday morning until noon."

"The irony is that it finally started working after 16 years of the airport being open, the week that they decided to do a sound study. There were literally no planes flying over and it was quieter here than in the deadest of off-season," said deAlva, who has lived in Last Dollar for nearly 16 years. "That is good news. It is evidence that they can make the pilots comply with the noise procedures."

Micetic agreed that the news of no noise was good news.

"That is the best news I've heard in a year. Conrad [Rauh, another Last Dollar resident] said he had never heard it so quiet," Micetic said. "I think if we can put good heads together we can do positive things."

While noise abatement procedures are voluntary (because of liability issues, the Federal Aviation Administration does not allow airports to enforce the procedures), airports are permitted to develop such procedures and educate pilots about those procedures. Recent efforts by the airport authority board to get the word out to pilots appears to be working.

"Maybe the word has gotten out," said airport board member Brian Eaton, a local resident and commercial pilot for Delta Airlines who has worked on proactive efforts to help the board educate pilots. "We are trying to be good neighbors."

According to Eaton, Nuttall is placing a video and a map on the airport's website this month; both illustrate what route pilots should follow when approaching the Telluride airport.

"With the map the pilots can see where the homes are in Last Dollar and Aldasoro, and see the Peaks," said Eaton. While folks have known they can call the airport and file a noise complaint, Eaton said more recently the airport has been proactive in following up on the complaints and contacting the offending pilot.

"We find the pilot and ask him to watch the video and I will follow-up on that if necessary," said Eaton

A map of the area showing the "Telluride No Fly Zones," according to Eaton, will also be placed in the operations area of the airport.

"I vote they hire somebody to be on the post everyday," said Daria, adding that the airport's technique of following up with the pilots seemed to have been particularly effective.

 

 

Music

Blues and brews

 

Sheridan Opera House Heats Up Wednesday Night with Mama’s Cookin’

 

Hws: Just the Beginning of a Music Lovers Gala, as Telluride Revs Up for Stellar Tenth Annual Blues and Brews

 

Mama’s Cookin’, the hiphop disco jazzed up and southern fried songsters from Crested Butte, hit the Sheridan Opera House Wednesday, Sept. 10. Doors open at 10:30 p.m.; showtime is 11 p.m. These Mama’s Boys have been busy in recent months, playing with everyone from Brian Jordan of Karl Denson's Tiny Universe to Rob Wasserman of Ratdog and to Cecil 'Peanut' Daniels, and with groups and artists such as Ozomatli, Jerry Joseph and the Jack Mormons, Robert Walter of the 20TH CONGRESS, Eric McFadden of P-FUNK, Mofro, Cabaret Diosa, The Motet, members of the band m.o.e., and GARAJ MAHAL .
The band's charismatic ringleader, Zebuel Early, demands attention with his gritty funk/blues guitar and vocals, reminiscent of an old southern bluesman. Born in Memphis and raised in the Delta, Mr. Early is steeped in the funk, jazz, and soul of the South. Tickets, $10 in advance and $12 at door, as well as at  www.tellurideticket.com and Wizard Entertainment. Call 728-6363 for more information or check out our website at www.sheridanoperahouse.com.

 

According to Telluride Blues and Brews Festival promoter Steve Gumbel, you’ve come a long way, baby!

It’s no accident that the fledgling concert Gumbel started ten years ago has come into its own, this year, with the Tenth Annual Blues and Brews Festival presenting such legendary acts as Joe Cocker and the Allman Brothers.

“I’ve been chasing the Allman Brothers for years,” the liquor store owner turned festival promoter confides. “Joe Cocker must have thought I was stalking him. Buddy Guy – what blues festival wish list is he not on?”

And that’s just a hint of this year’s lineup, which also includes the Alex Maryol Band; Sue Foley; Lucky Peterson; the Otis Taylor Band; G. Love and Special Sauce; Rory Block; Kenny Neal; Anders Osbourne; North Mississippi Allstars; Campbell Brothers; Cephas and Wiggins; Charlie Musselwhite; Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe; Buddy Miles; and Dwayne Dopsie and the Zydeco Hellraisers.

Telluride/Mountain Village audiences have been treated to shows, over the years, from more than a few of next weekend’s lineup, most recently Alex Maryol, and prior to that, Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, North Mississippi Allstars and Buddy Miles. California native Karl Denson has pioneered the mixing of Motown and Stax funk and soul with deep jazz from performers ranging from John Coltrane to Yusef Lateef Rahsaan Roland Kirk. Touring with Lenny Kravitz in the early 90s (when he cut Let Love Rule and Mama Said, as well as “Unwind Your Mind” with DJ Greyboy).

In the late 90s, Denson’s organic, free-form aesthetic characterized The Greyboy Allstars, the illustrious groove band. Denson’s wide range of work has earned him the reputation of being a ground-breaking musician, both as a collaborator and as a solo artist.

His recently released The Bridge offers further evidence that Denson/KDTU cannot be pinned down, with a roster of songs, from such chestnuts as “Because of Her Beauty” and “The Answer” to the highly political Curtis Mayfield classic, “Check Out Your Mind” and the Fela Kuti tribute, “Freedom.”

“After ten records, you feel like you’ve enriched someone’s life,” Denson says of his work. “The idea is to find something I like and help it cross over. I like and listen to all kinds of music. We’ve always just played what we like, and the audience came to us.”

On another end of the spectrum is 30-something Canadian-born Sue Foley, in whose music one critic for the Los Angeles Times heard “echoes of Earl Hooker, Bessie Smith, T-Bone Walker, Muddy Waters and other forebears of the blues.”

Foley has shared the stage with everyone from B.B. King to Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown and the late John Lee Hooker. Her new CD, Where the Action Is, will, her fans are confident, garner widespread attention in the blues world. It’s Foley’s seventh studio album, and continues in the fine tradition she has been forging for herself with everything from remakes of “Stupid Girl” to “Let It Go.” Her impressive discography includes Where the Action Is; Back to the Blues; Love Comin’ Down; Ten Days in November; Walk in the Sun; Big City Blues; Without a Warning and Young Girl Blues.

New to Telluride is Lucky Peterson, but with bass and production by Bill Laswell, drumming from 20-year Parliament-Funkadelic alum Jerome “Bigfoot” Brailey and horns and winds from Henry Threadgill, playing covers of pieces by Sly Stone, James Brown and even Mick Jagger – Peterson, at 38, is already a veteran of soul and the blues.

He has played with the greats – Little Milton, Bobby Blue Bland, Otis Rush and Etta James – and recently released Black Midnight Sun, a “molten slab of unusual and, dare we say it, slightly twisted update of a fistful of electric blues, rock, soul and funk classics,” according to music scholar Bill Murphy. “Laced with alternating flashes of dark introspection and spiritual redemption, a good deal of the music here almost perfectly encapsulates, given the tumultuous chain of world events of the last two years, the mixture of uneasiness and expectation so prevalent in today’s political and socioeconomic climates far less a ‘protest’ or even a ‘concept’ album than it is a masterful study in musicianship and free collaboration, and with a rhythm section” that’s world-class.

Peterson is no stranger to center stage; his first-ever record, recorded when he was age five, gained him appearances on everything from the Tonight Show to the Ed Sullivan Show to What’s My Line.

Another first timer in Telluride: Rory Block, whose fiery and haunting guitar/vocal attack redefines the boundaries of acoustic blues and folk. Block will be performing songs from her new release, Last Fair Deal, on Telarc. Another not-to-be-missed will by Harp player extraordinaire Charlie Musselwhite.

 

For in-depth coverage of the world-class Tenth Annual Blues and Brews Festival with Queen of the Night, Amy Kimberly, make sure to pick up next Tuesday’s and Friday’s issues of the Telluride Watch.


 

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30TH IMOGENE RUN SATURDAY – “I’m not running this year; it’s too dangerous,” says Imogene Pass 2002 participant Eric Fallenius, pictured above at last year’s finish line, brandishing his fund-raising banner for Just for Kids. Not dangerous for the other runners, emphasizes this athlete who solicits charitable contributions for his arduous training and competition programs, but for Fallenius himself, or, more precisely, for his plans to undertake the challenging high-altitude race so close to his plans to run in the Nov. 2 New York Marathon. The Imogene Pass Run, which turns 30 this year, covers a 17.1-mile course that climbs to a height of 13,114 feet at the summit of Imogene Pass. Fallenius hopes to raise $50,000 for JFK, the nonprofit children’s program funding organization of which he’s a board member.

“I love the race,” he says wistfully of the Imogene run, which has a whopping 1,500 participants, but “the New York City marathon is really important for me, this year, as a fund raiser. I was so happy to get in,” he says of the lottery-driving NYC run. “And I was so happy to get Carstens’s challenge,” he adds, of philanthropist Bill Carstens’s pledge to match all contributions, up to $50,000. For more info, call Fallenius at 728-4454 or 728-4382. To catch this year’s Imogene medaling runners as they cross the finish line, get to north Oak Street by 9:30 a.m. (File photo)

 

Shopping for a Home with Mike Wentworth

 

Seven Gables…and Enough House for a Family of Twelve, and More

 

By Elizabeth Covington

 

From an unremarkable beginning twelve years ago as a spec house, the home at 114 Lone Fir Lane in the Mountain Village, also known as Seven Gables, has welcomed and embraced several generations of Ohmstedes, local resident Jill Wentworth’s family.

“We always came for Christmas,” said Jill on a recent tour of the house, also known locally as the Ohmstede Family house. “The house easily fits twelve people.” Those twelve were all part of the extended Ohmstede clan, including Jill’s parents, Bob and Ann, Jill and her husband Mike Wentworth, a local real estate broker and attorney, Jill’s siblings, older sister Carol Koshkin and Jack, and their children Keith and Craig Koshkin, and younger brother John and Lynne Ohmstede. Also part of that clan are the two Wentworth children, Hilary and Travis, "plus cousins, great aunts and uncles, as well as Ann's brother' family and members of my family," said Mike.

Jill and Mike discovered Telluride, and found the family house, when driving to Aspen from Houston for a summer vacation in August 1990.

“We were driving in a caravan,” said Mike of the Ohmstede family summer migration from Texas to Colorado that summer.

One the way, Mike and Jill stopped in Telluride and, having read about the Mountain Village, took a self-guided tour that led them to Russell Drive and the left hand turn onto Lone Fir Lane.

“It was all dirt roads then,” says Mike. “This was one of the first houses being built. As we came down the drive we saw something was going on and Jeff Brooks and Mike Merritt were on the site.”

And, while Lone Fir is an appealing name for a cul-de-sac street on the Telluride Ski and Golf Co. golf course, those who named the street were not quite up to speed on their tree species.

“It is a twin-topped spruce,” says Mike pointing to the old growth evergreen for which the street was named.

Nonetheless, the house's setting along the fifth hole of the Telluride Golf Course, with its views of the San Sophia Ridge was impressive and Mike and Jill decided to take a closer look.

“It was a stunning day in August. The views were incredible; the house was the right size.  We loved it,” Jill says. They drove on to Aspen where the August monsoon rains moved in and unfortunately it rained every day of their vacation. Jill remembers being splashed by cars driving fast through potholes in town. She also remembers the “bold-face types” from Houston sitting in the Aspen sidewalk cafes. (“Bold-face types,” Jill explained, are the names in the local gossip column that are printed in bold type so the reader can easily pick them out of the crowd.) The rain and the Aspen scene were too much; Telluride seemed more and more attractive.

 

A FAMILY PLACE

When soon thereafter Jill’s father bought the house on Lone Fir, the home immediately became a gathering place for the family. In addition to Christmas gatherings, the Wentworth family spent several summers in the house, and grandparents Bob and Ann spent the better part of those three months with the Wentworths. Bob and Ann also found time to travel to Colorado on their own. The family also hosted “one of the best Christmas parties,” said Mike, who now has the listing for the house.

When Jill and Mike decided to escape Houston and move full-time to Telluride, the Wentworth family lived in the house for two years while building their own house in Telluride.

In addition, Jill’s nephews had their own fun in the house, hosting house parties for college friends. On several occasions, youthful guests inadvertently locked themselves out of the house. One chilly winter night nephew Keith Koshkin and his three friends were soaking in the hot tub and accidentally locked themselves out of the house. No one else was staying in the house at the time and they were out of luck. One of the four (who likely lost in an impromptu game of rock-paper-scissors) was chosen to go across the street to the neighbor’s and call Jill and Mike in Telluride.

“I had just gotten out of the shower and told him I couldn’t come up there,” said Jill. “I did tell him where we always hid a key.”

On another occasion during one of Keith's college get-togethers, one young woman ventured out on the master bedroom balcony and, pulling the door, locked it behind her. Though she called and called at the top of her lungs, no one at the party carrying on inside the house heard her. A neighbor across the golf course did hear her calls for help, however, and called the Mountain Village police. By the time the police arrived, the hapless girl had been rescued from the balcony. The police “handled the matter well,” said Mike of the misadventure.

The next day, however, one invitee called dial-a-ride for a lift home after a day of skiing. When he asked for a ride to the Ohmstede house, the response was telling: “Oh, to the murder house.” Apparently the young woman’s call for help had been convincing; so much so that the neighbor who telephoned the police reported a cry for help that sounded like someone was being murdered, said Mike.

Since those mishaps, the hardware on the doors has been switched out, said Jill, who as part of her work updating the house installed easy-to-use knobs.

That recent updating of the house by Finch Wentworth, the interior design firm owned by Jill and her business partner Patti Houston, is apparent in every detail. Every wall in the house, from the mudroom to the main entry to the each of the bedrooms, has been plastered, an updated look that though “a big job,” according to Mike, was well worth the effort, says Jill. The plastered walls warm the interior and make it feel cozy, but sophisticated.

In addition, the kitchen, with its black, green and mica-specked granite countertops, new Viking range, stainless KitchenAid appliances and Subzero refrigerator and freezer, is more than ready for a family of twelve, or Christmas party of one hundred. Log barstools are tucked under a raised bar that hides the mess of dinner prep or of getting ready for a party. To the side are a breakfast nook with great views of the San Sophia Ridge and a gas fireplace with comfy sofas. On the north side of the great room, the main entry with its host of windows fills the great room with warm, light from the south.

“The house has great solar exposure in the winter,” says Mike. The south side of the house, open not only to the winter sun’s warming rays, is also a perfect spot for sledding, says Jill. The driveway at the end of Lone Fir Lane is private and ideal for fast rides. In addition, where the drive is flat near the house and a hoop is set up on the garage doors is perfect for basketball games, Mike points out.

 

THE VILLAGE MARKET

Listed at $4.85 million, a price that includes the empty lot to the west, which creates a green buffer between it and its neighboring houses, in 1991 the house was the first to sell for over $1 million in the Village.

"That created quite a buzz in the real estate community at the time," Mike says. Currently, among the 72 houses listed for sale in Mountain Village, the house, the twentieth most expensive listing, is running in the middle of the pack.

"I find that remarkable, the fact that so many big houses were built in last five to ten years," says Wentworth. "This used to be a big house in this market and it is now a mid-priced house."

That the house is in the middle of the price range works to its advantage, according to Wentworth.

"I am not saying this is not a small house, but it is not cavernous. It is warm and inviting and comfortable for people to live in. I don’t want to play basketball in my living room," he said.

The real estate market in the Mountain Village is strengthening, according to Wentworth. Currently, seven or eight houses are under contract, an encouraging number given the fact that the market saw June and July pass without any houses going under contract.

"I think we are working down the inventory. There are only one or two spec houses currently being built," he says.

 

BACK IN THE HOUSE

From the kitchen a narrow pass-through hall equipped with a wet bar leads to a spacious great room that has one of fifty original wood-burning fireplaces allowed in the Mountain Village, Mike says. The fireplace opens on both sides, the other side opening to a roomy study. Nestled in the gable on the east end of the house is a roomy bedroom that could be a master bedroom, Jill points out. It is also the perfect bedroom for a guest who needs to stay on the main level.

A staircase leads from the entry to the three upstairs bedrooms, three baths, and a day bed tucked in a corner of the hallway. The west gable shelters a private bedroom with its own bath.

Though the house is more than a decade old, the home is not lacking in modern electronic conveniences, Mike points out. In-floor heat, an alarm system, motion detectors and a stereo system with built-in speakers are part of the package.

Downstairs on the ground floor is a playroom for the kids – with enough room for a pool table, says Jill – as well as a bedroom and attached bath, as well as a bunkroom. At times there were a dozen kids down here, says Mike. “We would find pizza boxes and Coke cans in the oddest places,” he adds.

Outside are two main brick patios, one with a hot tub and the other larger and with patio furniture. An apron of green lawn spreads down to the golf course.

“This is one of the first premiere properties on the golf course,” says Mike.

When age slowed Jill’s father in the last few years, the family gatherings at the house were more and more infrequent and in late 2000 they decided it was time to sell.

When Bob, the Ohmstede patrician, passed away this spring, the family redoubled its efforts to sell the house.

“It will be bittersweet when we sell,” said Mike, remembering the good times the family has had in the home.

 

Sports

 

Town League Soccer Revs Up with One Team Out and Ref Snafu Solved

 

By Martinique Davis

 

As of late last week, the future of Telluride’s Co-ed Soccer League was in jeopardy.

The first round of 2003 town league play saw too many game forfeitures and failures from teams to provide referees for assigned games, explains Telluride Parks and Recreation Department Recreation Supervisor Rich Hamilton. 

“It was starting to seem like the league wasn’t working out,” he says.

But after calling a Team Managers’ meeting early this week to discuss the league’s future in Round 2 as well as the league’s Round 1 failures, Hamilton says Telluride’s Co-ed Soccer League seems to be back on track with renewed interest from the league’s remaining six teams. One team, SCX, dropped out of the league due to lack of players.

“All the managers agreed to step it up and provide referees for their required games.  Everyone seems to be on the same page now, and are ready to make the second round happen,” says Hamilton.

He explains that the string of referee-less games and forfeited games is due to lack of players on certain teams caused a less-than-desirable Round 1 schedule.

The cause of the struggles in the first round, he continues, was the combination of a few teams not having enough female players as well as “the general laid-back Telluride attitude about having referee responsibilities.”

He says that despite the league’s firmness on teams’ referee responsibilities, brandishing a $50 price tag for the first no-show referee and another $50 plus a negative one added to the team’s stats for the second offense, many of the teams remained lackadaisical about providing referees in the beginning of the season.

“I was starting to think that maybe they just wanted pick-up games and no league at all,” Hamilton explains. “But at the meeting all the managers seemed adamant about keeping the league intact, and once they understood what it takes to have a league, they all agreed to keeping up their end of the deal.  I think it was a wake-up call for the teams,” he says.

 

REFEREE PROBLEMS ADDRESSED

This is the first year that the teams in the fall Co-ed Soccer League have been required to provide referees for games.  In previous years the Parks and Rec. Department would schedule a referee if they could for the town league games; if not, teams were then contacted and required to provide one.

The problem with that system, Hamilton explains, is that there are very few certified referees in town.  And as any town league referee knows, sometimes it’s not so enjoyable being the person of authority in a heated town league sports match.  Thus, this year the Parks and Rec. Department decided to require town league soccer teams to provide their own referees for games, as do the town’s summer softball and winter broomball leagues.

“When the referee responsibility is shared equally between a number of people, it seems to work out better than when the same few referees are at every single game,” Hamilton says.

A handful of members from each team attended the pre-season referee clinic to receive their referee certification.  All referees are paid to referee games, even though it is mandatory.

Hamilton says that when he explained to soccer team managers at the Tuesday night meeting that if they shipped in referees from Montrose to oversee town league games it would cost teams $1,250 each, they unanimously agreed to continue providing referees from their team roster.

 

ROUND TWO BEGINS

With the referee snafu finally resolved, the 2003 Co-ed Soccer League Round 2 schedule has been established.  The first game of Round 2 saw The Last Bag give their all against Fat Alley BBQ on Wednesday night, ending the game with a 1-1 tie.

After a soccer-less weekend due to Saturday’s rain-cancelled games, both teams started the match a little sluggish but quickly picked up the pace to play a fiery match.  Despite concern in the league about lack of female players, Wednesday’s game saw plenty of the fairer sex on and off the field, on both sides.

“Our girls are so good!” Fat Alley player Mo Hanna was overheard saying as Fat Alley’s female squad of Kim Richard, Lois Major, Katy James, and Sarah Domurat dominated the field against The Last Bag on Wednesday night.

The Last Bag’s mid-field force of Caleb Martin, Johnny Haas, Susan Heard and Doug Oplt put on the pressure, however, coming up with a few early-game breakaways.

Fat Alley broke the pressure with a goal late in the first half, with retired SCX-turned-Fat Alley center middy Dusty Atherton taking a shot, which was deflected by newbie Last Bag goalie Matt Rich, then pummeled into the net by the BBQ’s Brian “Grimmy” Beckham.

The Last Bag turned the burners to high in the second half of the game, with more breakaways from the fearsome Martin/Haas duo.  The Fat Alley’s own formidable force in the net, goalie Bobby Murphy, truly held his team up as Martin and Haas shot away, only to be denied by Murphy’s flying, diving and jumping saves.

Martin finally nailed one in to tie the game, which led both teams into a fever-pitch match of town league soccer.

Fat Alley thought their game was won, as did most of The Last Bag, as both teams held their breath when Beckham fired one from far out.  The shot was deflected by Last Bag defense, only to be nailed back towards the net, missing the net by mere centimeters and hitting the goal post.  When Fat Alley offense lined up to take shot number three, with goalie Rich scrambling for his feet, Last Bag defender Jason Gordon took the BBQ shot in the chest, blocking its sure lane into the goalie-less net.

Despite impassioned complaints from the BBQ side that the block had resulted in a hand ball in the box, there was no call and the game continued sans a BBQ penalty shot.

Last Bagger Heard tried valiantly to put one more point on the scoreboard in the last minutes of the game, breaking past Fat Alley defense and just missing the upper right corner of the net with her shot.

Despite tight pressure from both sides, neither team’s offense was able to finish the game a goal ahead, and the ref’s whistle blew with a 1-1 tie score.

Results from Thursday’s game between Who’s Your Daddy and Smuggler’s were not available as of press time, but look for Telluride Co-ed Soccer League match-ups every weekday evening until mid-October.

Tonight, Bluecorn Roma faces Latinos Cindy Bread at 6 p.m. at Bear Creek.  On Monday, The Last Bag and Who’s Your Daddy play at 5:45 p.m. at the Bear Creek field.  For copies of the new Round 2 soccer schedule, contact a team manager or pick one up at the Parks and Rec. office in Town Park.

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