Friday, March 4, 2003  content presented by Telluride Today .com About The Watch

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Fight at the Peaks Leads to Stabbing, Emergency Surgery

In the aftermath of a fight at the Peaks Hotel Thursday, Feb. 27 at approximately 4 p.m., two men were sent via ambulance to Telluride Medical Center.

One man – a 30-year-old guest at the Peaks from Florida – was treated and released. The other, a 23-year-old worker from Arizona, was sent via ambulance to Montrose Memorial Hospital.

As to unofficial reports that the fight took place in a second-floor room, Mountain Village Deputy Chief Chris Broady said: "We are still trying to piece that together." Broady confirmed that officers "have talked to both parties."

The Arizona man underwent surgery Thursday night for "a single stab wound to the lower abdomen," Mountain Village Police Chief Dale Wood said.

The Florida man was treated and released at Telluride Medical Center; he returned to the Peaks that evening.

"He was here on a business trip/vacation," Wood said of the Florida man, who has since left for home. "We are in contact with that party," he added, "but we never effected an arrest."

As for the 23-year-old Peaks employee, Wood said: "Give me another day or two – the individual is doing remarkably better, considering the situation he was involved in. Hopefully we can release something in a day or two."

Pressed as to why he has yet to name a suspect or to even label the incident a crime, Wood said: "This is a lot more complicated than Party A stabbing Party B.

"I can't really disclose the details," he added.

"He is under some pretty significant medication," he said of the Peaks employee, going on, however, to emphasize that it would be inappropriate to apply the word "suspect" to either party in the incident.

"I can't refer to the victim as a suspect," he added.

"The other party was investigated at length" Thursday night, Wood emphasized, "and as it stands right now, we have no probable cause to effect an arrest.

"It is a very complex situation," he added.

Wood confirmed both men are American citizens.

Ridgway Council and Ouray Republican Leaders Clash on Anti-War Resolution

“Safe Zone” Resolution Gets Unanimous Support

By Christopher Pike

The Ridgway Town Council’s Feb. 12 split vote, 4-3, for a resolution opposing a unilateral war on Iraq without permitted UN approval has triggered a debate over the legitimacy of a town body taking a stand on a controversial foreign policy matter.

Ridgway residents Priscilla Peters, Sheryle Pettet and Susan Baker drafted and presented the resolution, with Peters reading it to the public. The resolution calls for a “genuinely multilateral diplomatic approach to the Iraq situation, sanctioned and directed by the United Nations” and asks that weapons inspections be pursued fully before any further military action commences. The Ridgway Town Clerk forwarded copies of the resolution to President Bush, Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell and Congressman Scott McInnis.

The council’s action drew a large number of citizens with sharply differing opinions into the town hall meeting room. Mayor Pat Willits, who voted in favor, asked the other council members to act as the town council, and not for the town-at-large, in taking their position.

Councilwoman Sandy Engraff voted against the resolution because she thought that the town residents should sign a petition containing the resolution, instead of the town council alone doing so. Others who voted no reasoned that not enough constituents favored the statement and that the time for diplomacy had run out.

The Ouray County Republican Central Committee convened the next day and on Feb. 16 adopted a resolution stating their full support of the Bush administration’s efforts in the war on terror “including the actions taken by the President toward eliminating weapons of mass destruction held by Iraq and changing the regime in Iraq, and fully support[ing] the use of force in Iraq and elsewhere in the war on terror, if necessary, to assure to the highest degree the preservation of our freedoms and the security and safety of our citizens and our friends and allies.”

In a prepared statement, Democratic Central Committee Chairman John Hollrah said this week that “there is little doubt that the Bush Administration will attack Iraq within the next 30 days. I think this ‘pre-emption doctrine’ and concomitant attack will 1) increase the likelihood of one or more terrorist attacks within the U.S. soon after the attack, 2) greatly increase the recruitment ability of Al Qaida, and 3) further increase worldwide resentment and ill will toward the U.S. government and, unfortunately, the American people. I think the people in the Bush Administration agreed with these three consequences and yet continued a ‘path of no return’ (military build-up) because they think the potential rewards will outweigh the negative results. Many intelligent people with military and diplomacy backgrounds gravely disagree.”

“The people who voted took the risk of criticism on a matter that’s not normally town business,” Willits said. “There are times and issues important enough to stick your political neck out. I have faith that the war can be averted, and it’s for the lives of innocent people.”

While council’s anti-war resolution was controversial, a second resolution, a “civil liberties safe zone resolution,” affirming the town’s commitment, in light of the federal USA Patriot Act, to the protection of civil liberties “for all people as expressed in the United States and State of Colorado Constitutions,” passed unanimously.

The Patriot Act, passed on October 26, 2001, expands the authority of the federal government to detain and investigate citizens and non-citizens and engage in electronic surveillance of citizens and non-citizens.

This resolution begins by restating the policy of the Ridgway Police Department that calls for “all detentions or stops (to) be supported by reasonable suspicion that a crime has been committed or is about to be committed, and that all arrests and searches of person and/or property by officers in Ridgway must be conducted in compliance with the Fourth Amendment of the US Constitution and Article II, Section 7 of the Colorado Constitution.”

The resolution states the community’s “strong opposition to terrorism but also affirms that any efforts to end terrorism should not be waged at the expense of essential civil rights and liberties of the people of Ridgway, the United States and the World.”

The civil liberties “safe zone” resolution has, as of Feb. 25, found support in 47 cities across America including Los Angeles, Baltimore, Washington, D.C., New York, Chicago, Denver, Boulder, Durango, and Ft. Collins.

 

Bantams Beat Oak Creek, Make It to Rocky Mountain League Semi-Finals

By Martinique Davis

“How do you spell ‘phew’?” said a travel-weary Bantams head coach John Cohn after the Bantams' close 2-1 victory over Oak Creek in the first round of the Rocky Mountain Youth Hockey League Regional Championships this weekend. 

Though the Telluride squad easily defeated the Oak Creek crew earlier in the season, Oak Creek brought out their toughest and their best on Saturday – giving Telluride some stiff competition.

“I think the guys went into the game a little overconfident,” Cohn said, pointing to Telluride’s one-point deficit in the first period. “They came out a little flat… but the upshot is that they were behind, and they didn’t get freaked out, and they were able to pull out of it.”

Three minutes after Oak Creek scored their first and only goal, Telluride’s “go-to" guy J.D. Kirkendoll managed to sneak the puck past Oak Creek’s resilient goalkeeper off an assist from Charlie Cohn and Kolby Ward. Though Kirkendoll scored another goal to secure the Telluride win, Coach Cohn says that it was definitely a tough game for the still-undefeated league record Telluride Bantams.

“It got to the point when we were asking, ‘Are we ever going to score?’” Cohn says, maintaining that it was Oak Creek’s phenomenal goalie that made Telluride have to work so hard for the win. Though Telluride had 22 shots on goal compared to Oak Creek’s 14, the Oak Creek defense – backed up by their goalie-as-brick-wall in front of the net – made Telluride offense scramble more than a few times.

“I hope this game was a wakeup call for the guys, because they came out a little flat.  They’re really going to need to step it up for the next game,” Cohn says, which takes place this Saturday at 2:30 p.m. in Steamboat Springs, against the burly Craig team.

“It’s going to be a physical game, because the Craig guys are huge,” says Cohn.  “They’re usually the best in the league, and we’re going to have to utilize our skating and our speed to beat them.”

Cohn says that, thanks to all the hard work of the Telluride Parks and Recreation staff as well as the cold weather, he anticipates that the Bantams will be able to continue skating on the Town Park rink for a few last practices.

If the Bantams beat Craig in the semi-finals on Saturday, they win a berth to the league finals, Sunday morning at 7:45 p.m. in Steamboat Springs.

“I think we have a shot at it,” Cohn says. “I still think we’re the best team, and that we have the most skills of any team out there – it’s whether we put those skills together at game time is another story. But that’s what I’m here for, to pump the guys up.”

Mark English Exhibit and Book-Signing Tonight

Painter extraordinaire Mark English, something of a fixture on the Telluride scene for more than a decade, will be present at Telluride Gallery of Fine Art opening Tuesday at 5 p.m. to sign copies of a new book about his life and work by art critic Jill Bossert.

English has been coming to Telluride regularly since the early 90s (sometimes with his son, John, also an artist), and exhibiting at the gallery as well as teaching classes at the Ah Haa School.

Born in Hubbard, Tex., English painted his way out of his hometown, where he worked as a boy picking cotton. At age 14, he started painting rodeo signs and soon cowboys, broncos and bull riders.

A stint in the Army proved fortuitous, when English met friends-for-life Harvey Schmidt and Robert Benton.

Schmidt urged English – who at that point says he had not yet heard of Michelangelo – to head to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif.; the two stayed in touch as Schmidt went on to become an award-winning illustrator and composer of The Fantasticks. Benton first went to work as art director at Esquire magazine, before heading for Hollywood, where he directed films including Kramer vs. Kramer and Places in the Heart.

English took perhaps more of a journeyman route to the top, working as an advertising illustrator, initially at Philadelphia's N.W. Ayer advertising firm on the Plymouth car account, soon heading to Detroit, where he worked for the flourishing automobile advertising industry.

Art directors loved the "Popsicle shiny cars" in his drawings; soon English moved to magazine work in New York.

His first magazine job was for The Saturday Evening Post; he went on to Redbook, Reader's Digest and then, in the 1960s, won the prestigious Society of Illustrators award for his illustrations for the books Little Women and A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.

In 1977, English headed to Kansas City, Missouri, to become artist-in-residence for Hallmark Cards; after nearly a decade there, he went solo. "I lost interest in illustrations," he said, and decided to dedicate himself to painting full-time in the early 1990s.

Son John says of those early days: "I watched him go through hell removing himself from illustration and dependency on photography, that mind set. But soon English senior proved himself as a brilliant painter, as well.

His wife Wendy says of English: "He's extraordinary in his search to always better himself as an artist, and I think that's what separates him from so many others…he's never satisfied to repeat himself, and always wants to take it to the next level, wherever that may be."

The book, titled simply Mark English, takes readers on a retrospective tour of English's development as an artist.

As longtime friend Jack Unruh, a fellow Texan and an illustrator as well, says of English: "Walk around in Mark's head – it's a hell of a stroll. The stuff he draws from is there – he sees it, stores it, assimilates it, translates it and puts it out in wondrous ways for us to see."

Meet the artist and get acquainted with his work Tuesday night, at 5:30 p.m., at the Telluride Gallery of Fine Art.

Mark English Exhibit and Book-Signing Tonight

Painter extraordinaire Mark English, something of a fixture on the Telluride scene for more than a decade, will be present at Telluride Gallery of Fine Art opening Tuesday at 5 p.m. to sign copies of a new book about his life and work by art critic Jill Bossert.

English has been coming to Telluride regularly since the early 90s (sometimes with his son, John, also an artist), and exhibiting at the gallery as well as teaching classes at the Ah Haa School.

Born in Hubbard, Tex., English painted his way out of his hometown, where he worked as a boy picking cotton. At age 14, he started painting rodeo signs and soon cowboys, broncos and bull riders.

A stint in the Army proved fortuitous, when English met friends-for-life Harvey Schmidt and Robert Benton.

Schmidt urged English – who at that point says he had not yet heard of Michelangelo – to head to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif.; the two stayed in touch as Schmidt went on to become an award-winning illustrator and composer of The Fantasticks. Benton first went to work as art director at Esquire magazine, before heading for Hollywood, where he directed films including Kramer vs. Kramer and Places in the Heart.

English took perhaps more of a journeyman route to the top, working as an advertising illustrator, initially at Philadelphia's N.W. Ayer advertising firm on the Plymouth car account, soon heading to Detroit, where he worked for the flourishing automobile advertising industry.

Art directors loved the "Popsicle shiny cars" in his drawings; soon English moved to magazine work in New York.

His first magazine job was for The Saturday Evening Post; he went on to Redbook, Reader's Digest and then, in the 1960s, won the prestigious Society of Illustrators award for his illustrations for the books Little Women and A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.

In 1977, English headed to Kansas City, Missouri, to become artist-in-residence for Hallmark Cards; after nearly a decade there, he went solo. "I lost interest in illustrations," he said, and decided to dedicate himself to painting full-time in the early 1990s.

Son John says of those early days: "I watched him go through hell removing himself from illustration and dependency on photography, that mind set. But soon English senior proved himself as a brilliant painter, as well.

His wife Wendy says of English: "He's extraordinary in his search to always better himself as an artist, and I think that's what separates him from so many others…he's never satisfied to repeat himself, and always wants to take it to the next level, wherever that may be."

The book, titled simply Mark English, takes readers on a retrospective tour of English's development as an artist.

As longtime friend Jack Unruh, a fellow Texan and an illustrator as well, says of English: "Walk around in Mark's head – it's a hell of a stroll. The stuff he draws from is there – he sees it, stores it, assimilates it, translates it and puts it out in wondrous ways for us to see."

Meet the artist and get acquainted with his work Tuesday night, at 5:30 p.m., at the Telluride Gallery of Fine Art.

Mark English Exhibit and Book-Signing Tonight

Painter extraordinaire Mark English, something of a fixture on the Telluride scene for more than a decade, will be present at Telluride Gallery of Fine Art opening Tuesday at 5 p.m. to sign copies of a new book about his life and work by art critic Jill Bossert.

English has been coming to Telluride regularly since the early 90s (sometimes with his son, John, also an artist), and exhibiting at the gallery as well as teaching classes at the Ah Haa School.

Born in Hubbard, Tex., English painted his way out of his hometown, where he worked as a boy picking cotton. At age 14, he started painting rodeo signs and soon cowboys, broncos and bull riders.

A stint in the Army proved fortuitous, when English met friends-for-life Harvey Schmidt and Robert Benton.

Schmidt urged English – who at that point says he had not yet heard of Michelangelo – to head to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif.; the two stayed in touch as Schmidt went on to become an award-winning illustrator and composer of The Fantasticks. Benton first went to work as art director at Esquire magazine, before heading for Hollywood, where he directed films including Kramer vs. Kramer and Places in the Heart.

English took perhaps more of a journeyman route to the top, working as an advertising illustrator, initially at Philadelphia's N.W. Ayer advertising firm on the Plymouth car account, soon heading to Detroit, where he worked for the flourishing automobile advertising industry.

Art directors loved the "Popsicle shiny cars" in his drawings; soon English moved to magazine work in New York.

His first magazine job was for The Saturday Evening Post; he went on to Redbook, Reader's Digest and then, in the 1960s, won the prestigious Society of Illustrators award for his illustrations for the books Little Women and A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.

In 1977, English headed to Kansas City, Missouri, to become artist-in-residence for Hallmark Cards; after nearly a decade there, he went solo. "I lost interest in illustrations," he said, and decided to dedicate himself to painting full-time in the early 1990s.

Son John says of those early days: "I watched him go through hell removing himself from illustration and dependency on photography, that mind set. But soon English senior proved himself as a brilliant painter, as well.

His wife Wendy says of English: "He's extraordinary in his search to always better himself as an artist, and I think that's what separates him from so many others…he's never satisfied to repeat himself, and always wants to take it to the next level, wherever that may be."

The book, titled simply Mark English, takes readers on a retrospective tour of English's development as an artist.

As longtime friend Jack Unruh, a fellow Texan and an illustrator as well, says of English: "Walk around in Mark's head – it's a hell of a stroll. The stuff he draws from is there – he sees it, stores it, assimilates it, translates it and puts it out in wondrous ways for us to see."

Meet the artist and get acquainted with his work Tuesday night, at 5:30 p.m., at the Telluride Gallery of Fine Art.

 

Lady Miners Win Berth in Regionals

First Time in 53 Years

By Elizabeth Heerwagen

Though the Lady Miners fell to Dolores on Saturday, their Friday night win over Nucla secured Telluride a spot in the Regional basketball tournament next weekend. By beating Nucla in a close game, the Lady Miners, and the four seniors on the team, made history when they were advanced to Regionals, a first-time feat for the 53-year-old team.

When the Lady Miners faced off against Nucla Friday night, it had been less than a week since Telluride easily defeated the same team at their homecoming game. With confidence in their superior abilities on the court, the Lady Miners jumped ahead early and headed to the locker room at the end of the half, feeling at ease with their considerable lead of 37-19 over the Mustangs.

However, that confident attitude and comfortable lead dwindled in the second half. Nucla came out determined to fight hard and refusing to tolerate two consecutive Lady Miner trounces. When Nucla cut Telluride's lead to 13 in the third period, the Telluride team became a bit frantic at the possibility of a Nucla upset. For many of last years' players, the game was taking a turn for the worse, much like last years' upsetting, season-ending loss to Nucla.

Flustered, the Lady Miners failed to make the fluid, collaborative plays of the first half and reverted to making half-hazard passes and ill-advised shots at the basket. By the end of the fourth period, the Mustangs had cut the Telluride lead to single digits and threatened the Lady Miners with the possible upset.

Not helping matters was the fact that the Lady Miners lead offensive player, senior Chelsey Padilla, was forced to sit out most of the game after she encountered early foul trouble. While Padilla normally is the Lady Miner's leading scorer, in Friday's game she was on the court for a short six or seven minutes and not able to rack up points on the Lady Miners' side of the scoreboard. Disappointed at not being able to play in what could have been the senior’s last game, Padilla had to rely on her teammates to secure a victory.

While the team and coaches believed many of the foul calls that took Padilla out of the game were unjust, the Lady Miners had to make due with the cards they were dealt and in spite of Padilla's absence, the Lady Miners pulled it together.

Senior Kimber Hall proved that she too was not ready to end her high school basketball career by losing to Nucla; she assisted her team to victory with 13 points. In addition, Traci Ranta played consistent, solid defense, slowing Nucla and diminishing their chances for a win. Michael Arnold also helped her team in her strong perimeter shooting as she made important three-point plays. Fellow senior Rhea DePatger sealed the victory by sinking four freethrows in the final minutes.

Although the Lady Miners narrowly snuck past Nucla with a final score of 53-47, the victory ensured that the Lady Miner season will continue at least one more weekend.

Although the Lady Miners knew that they were assured a spot in the Regional tournament, the girls did not back down as they came face-to-face with the Dolores team Saturday. The nemesis of the Telluride team, Dolores has produced a steady streak of wins over the Lady Miners.

Unfortunately, Saturday's game was no exception to this trend. Throughout the four periods, each side switched leads and at half time, the score was tied 27-27. Arnold was a critical key to the Lady Miner success of the first half as she hit three of four three- pointers alone in the first two periods. The Lady Miners cranked up their level of play and kept it going in the second half, but were unable to steal and hold on to a lead.

When Dolores managed to make one crucial run in the third period, they established and held onto a lead that set up their victory. The Lady Miners did not back down, however, and pressed their pursuit of an upset win. With only six seconds left in the game, Inga Johansson nailed a three pointer to bring the Lady Miners within one point of Dolores.

However, one point was enough for Dolores to take the win and they defeated Telluride 41-40.

Assistant coach Jaden Wells said he was “really proud of the girls” and the two “great games they played this weekend.” Most likely, in next weekend's Regionals the Lady Miners will play number one seeded North Park, a team that has only lost one game this season next Saturday in Grand Junction. Wells said that he is confident that the game against North Park will be a “good match up” as the girls undergo another week of hard practice to prepare for Regionals.

Telluride Ski Team Sends Four Racers to Junior Olympics

Schuler, Story, Waldman on J3 Team; Crowell, Jaeger on J4

TST’S CROWELL, JAEGER QUALIFY FOR J4 JUNIOR OLYMPICS AT PRATER CUP

Two Telluride Ski and Snowboard Club alpine racers qualified at the Dan Prater Memorial Cup races in Crested Butte February 21-23 to represent the Rocky Mountain Division at the Junior Olympic level.

J4 (11-12 years) racers Madison Crowell and Ryan Jaeger were named to the Rocky Mountain Division JO Team after a competitive three days of Super G, slalom and giant slalom races; five in all.

“Madison has really proven herself the most improved girl on the team this year," said Barrett Stein, alpine program director. “As far as Ryan goes, if it’s steep and icy, there’s no stopping him.”

Crowell’s combined finishes of fifth in the Super G, 17th in both giant slaloms and a 13th and 14th in the slalom races earned her an overall ranking of 15th and a spot on the 27-member JO Team.  A field of 90 young women traveled to Crested Butte from clubs statewide to try out for the JO Team.

In the boys' J4 division, Jaeger’s overall score put him in 41st place, enough to make the 46-member boys JO Team. A total of 113 boys were vying for the coveted top 46 places. Jaeger placed 31st in Super G, 27th in giant slalom and 46th and 38th in slalom competition over the three-day meet.

Crowell and Jaeger will go onto the race in the J4 JOs hosted by Steamboat Springs March 19-22.

Other Telluride Ski Team members who competed in the Prater Cup events included Tasha Daranyi, Reilly Miller, Emaline Pryor, Kenya Strong-Johnston, Stuart Brown, Ryan Hampton, Woody Smith and Luke Story. All have one more shot at a spot on the girls’ and boys’ JO Team March 8 at the Council Cup in Leadville where the first-place female and male finishers go on to take the last two spots on the team.

On February 17, Lang Schuler, Ashley Story and Isabel Waldman were named to the JO Team as J3s (ages 13-14), following the conclusion of the J3 Junior Olympic Qualifying Races in Winter Park. Schuler became one of 47, and Story and Waldman two of 31 young ski racers named to the Rocky Mountain Division’s Junior Olympic Team from around the state. All three will compete against the Midwest’s Central Division Team March 9-16 at the J3 Junior Olympics hosted by Winter Park.

“Lang has trained so hard this season, he really deserves this spot on the team as a first-year J3,” noted Stein, adding: “Ashley and Isabel are peaking right now and it’s going to be exciting to watch them at the JOs.”

The Telluride Ski Team’s youngest squad of racers, the J5s ages 10-under, traveled to Sunlight March 1-2 for the USSA J5 Finale, the season-ending race series that saw clubs from Colorado, New Mexico and Wyoming competing in two slalom and two giant slalom races.

For more information on the Telluride Ski Team and upcoming events, contact Telluride Ski and Snowboard Club Executive Director Cara Nakata at 970-728-6163 or go online at www.tssc.org.

County Commissioners Pass an Anti-War Resolution

Ebert Dissents

By Seth Cagin

 

San Miguel County joined the Town of Telluride and hundreds of other local governments around the country in adopting a resolution opposing “unilateral, preemptive military action” against Iraq.

The resolution was brought forward by Commissioner Art Goodtimes, who said that as a conscientious objector during the Vietnam War, he felt a “moral obligation” to speak out against the imminent war. He was joined by Commissioner Elaine Fischer, who said that she had read widely in order to reach a decision on how she would vote on the resolution and had concluded that the United States was at the brink of war due to diplomatic failings. She, too, felt a moral obligation to speak out, she said.

Commissioner Vern Ebert opposed the resolution, but was not to be outdone in the morality department. He said that protests against the war only give comfort and encouragement to Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, and by encouraging his defiance of U.N. resolutions to disarm make war more likely.

Ebert said Hussein is “as evil or more evil than Josef Stalin,” and said, “I have a moral feeling about that, too.”

Goodtimes did agree to a suggestion by Telluride resident Greg Craig to send a letter to Hussein at the United Nations, urging his compliance with the United Nations, on the basis that disarmament was the only sure way to avoid a war. The commissioners agreed unanimously to send that letter.

Craig said he would have preferred that the commissioners refrain from taking any position at all on a foreign policy matter, arguing that the members of U.S. Congress, and not the San Miguel County Commissioners, are the elected officials charged with foreign policy.  He described the antiwar resolution as “an empty gesture on your part.”

But the county meeting room was filled with far more citizens who urged the commissioners to take the action, than by those opposed to it.

Martin Thomas said that if Ebert was right that protest would only “drag the process out,” then that is precisely what should happen to interrupt the “rush to war.”

Thom Carnevale said that the United States was not dealing openly with “the imponderables” of war. “We seem to feel so sure the war will go our way, but it is a very difficult situation,” he said, citing likely instability in the Mideast after the war is finished.

Elisabeth Gick said she is a pacifist, “opposed to all war,” but all the more opposed to a preemptive strike, which she said is “even more immoral.”

“I’m very grateful to Art for bringing this forward,” she said.

Chris Meyer said he is a former Republican, and the son of a senior CIA officer, who became an activist after 9/11 when he saw how “the fear that arose out of that tragedy was being manipulated.”

Phil Miller describe the horrors of war he witnessed as an infantryman during World War II.  John Roth said that he, too, is a pacifist who believes there is “never a reason for violence.”

On the other side of the issue, Gaylord Ingersoll questioned free-flying estimates that thousands will die in a war and asked if anyone could estimate the American lives that might be lost if Iraq is not disarmed, and Hussein’s weapons of mass destruction fall into the hands of terrorists.

Goodtimes, the sponsor of the resolution, observed that “people of good intentions, with different beliefs, have different perspectives on this issue.” But, he said that the war against Iraq represents “a new policy direction” for the United States, of preemptive unilateral strike, “not against a country that threatens us, but against a country that may threaten us in the future.”

“Everyone here is a patriot,” he said. “We have a difference of opinion about foreign policy.”

 

 

 

 

 

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